Cookstoves, Peru

Peru-cookstoves-mountain

The Qori Q’oncha cookstoves project is working across Peru including the Andean Altiplano

Project name
Qori Q'oncha, Coosktoves project, Peru
Project location
Peru: Piura, Cajamarca, La Libertad, Huánuco, Cusco, Huancavelica, Arequipa, Moquegua y Tacna
Funder and supplier
Microsol
Standard
Gold Standard
Project status
Operational
Portfolio
2017

UN Sustainable Development Goals supported

About the project

The first improved cookstoves program of activities registered with the voluntary carbon market.

More than 3 billion people in the world still cook on traditional open fire stoves with solid fuel and 3.7 million people die each year from causes related to this combustion. It corresponds to 1 person dying every 8.5 seconds. In Peru 2,000,0001 families cook with solid fuels on open fires inside their homes and in many cases, without ventilation exposing people to smoke, dust and toxic gases generated by the combustion. This indoor pollution explains the significant incidence of acute respiratory and lung diseases in Andean rural families.1

It is possible to improve this situation through the construction and use of improved cookstoves that have an enclosed combustion chamber which burns much more efficiently and then evacuates the smoke from the house through a chimney.

The program replaces open fires for household energy needs. Such fires cause indoor air pollution which can contribute to increased likelihood of illness, including acute lower respiratory infections such as pneumonia in young children, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer in women who predominantly do the cooking (and to a lesser degree in men).

Locally produced, the improved cookstoves from the Qori Q’oncha program are delivered with community members trained in installation and maintenance of the built-in stoves.

To Jan 2017, 106,056 improved cookstoves have been installed benefitting over 450,000 people from rural communities living in poverty.

Peru-cookstoves-family

Families in the Qori Q’oncha cookstoves project are benefitting from cleaner kitchens and more efficient cooking

Who is behind the project?

To April 2017 the project has generated four carbon credits issuances, corresponding to USD 4.5 million given to Microsol’s local partners in order to ensure the durability of their projects. It currently includes projects of 6 projects developers in nine regions of Peru: Piura, Cajamarca, La Libertad, Huánuco, Cusco, Huancavelica, Arequipa, Moquegua y Tacna.

Contribution to carbon reduction

Overview of contribution to carbon reduction (tC02e for the project to date and target for whole project lifetime)

  • 884,429 tonnes of CO2e until August 2014
  • Over 3 million tonnes of C02e expected over project lifetime

How do the projects contribute to carbon reduction?

Improved cookstoves are simple and eco-friendly technologies, with two main features:

  • The chimney evacuates the smoke outside the house.
  • The closed combustion chamber ensures a higher thermal efficiency than traditional fires.

The technology also has other advantages such as:

  • Considerable saving of fuel (wood).
  • More safety by reducing the risk of injury (insulation of the combustion chamber and protection of cookware).
  • Improved indoor air quality.

Because the new cookstoves burn wood much more efficiently there is reduction in deforestation and related CO2 emissions.

Improved cookstoves of the Qori Q’oncha program are made out of adobe bricks for the platform, cast iron for the rocket combustion chamber and steel for the chimney. Adobe bricks are made locally with dried clay/straw mix and other spare parts are shipped from Lima.

Key benefits

  • Environment
    Because the new cookstoves burn wood much more efficiently there is reduction in deforestation and related CO2 emissions.
  • No Poverty
    So far the project has benefitted over 450,000 people in the poorest segment of Peruvian population.
  • Health & well being
    The program replaces open fires for household energy needs. Such fires cause indoor air pollution which can contribute to increased likelihood of illness, including acute lower respiratory infections such as pneumonia in young children, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer in women who predominantly do the cooking (and to a lesser degree in men).
    The cookstoves are fitted with chimneys which significantly improve indoor air quality.
  • Peru-cookstoves-small-images

    The cookstoves from the Qori Q’oncha cookstoves project have two surfaces for cooking, a hotplate and a hob.

  • Gender Equality
    In Qori Q’oncha the great majority of women cook and collect wood so they are the first to benefit from the new cookstove implementation.
  • Decent work & Economic Growth
    1,0162 (permanent and temporary job positions have been created by the cookstove projects. The large majority of staff are certified technicians working in service centres or independently, while others work on project monitoring and administration.

Learn more about the project

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Added value benefits

Carbon management projects are able to contribute to improving the livelihoods of local their communities in significant ways. These benefits are a vital part of the broader aims of creating lasting social and environmental sustainability. The benefits are in support of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and include improvements to local economies through employment, higher value produce and infrastructure upgrades. Many projects will have health benefits, education improvements and a positive impact on gender equality. Different types of projects will carry different benefits. Research commissioned by ICROA and carried out by Imperial College in 2014 set to quantify the impact of voluntary carbon market investments.

For every one tonne of carbon emission reduction, cookstove projects deliver additional added value equal to $7243:

Cookstoves-additional-benefits

  1. 2 million families in Peru > National Census of Peru 2007 (exactly 2,036, 901 families cook with biomass)
  2. Monitoring reports from 3rd verification and validated by the DOE and GS
  3. Source: Figures from ICROA survey Kountouris, Y., Makuch, Z., Tan Loh, E.F. (2014) ‘Quantification and Evaluation of the Voluntary Carbon Market’s Co-benefits’, Imperial College London University June 2014

For further information: bptargetneutral@bp.com